• Wappingers Office
    (845) 297 4700
    (845) 297 8178
  • Lagrange Office
    (845) 485 2700
    (845) 485 2703
  • New Paltz Office
    (845) 255 6163
    (845) 255 6757
  • Commercial Real Estate Division
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    (845) 567 8333

Blogs

Lower Credit Score After Home Purchase? Don't Worry!

After spending months (or even years) boosting their credit score in order to qualify for the best possible mortgage, new homeowners are often dismayed to see their score fall after finally purchasing their dream home. Perhaps even more alarmingly, this decline often lags several months behind the purchase, making buyers question what actually caused it to happen. Luckily, a new study by LendingTree shows that this is not only normal, but generally corrects itself in less than one year! Keep reading to learn why scores fall after buying a home, how large you should expect the decline to be, and when you can expect the score to return to normal.

Which State's Mortgage Borrowers Put the Most Down?

Saving for the down payment is understandably regarded as one of the most difficult aspects of buying a home. Although the exact number depends on the purchase price, buyers generally need to come up with tens of thousands of dollars up front in order to take out their mortgage. Of course, any statistic will display a wide range of averages across the nation's fifty states, and both down payment amounts and percentages follow this rule. With that in mind, LendingTree sought to determine which state's buyers were offering up the largest and smallest down payments on their mortgages in Q3. They found that New York came in near the top of the list in both down payment amount and percentage.

What's the Best Way to Determine Your Home's Value?

Many homeowners believe that they have the strongest insight into the value of their home; after all, only they understand all of the blood, sweat, and tears (and money) that have been put into countless maintenance and improvement projects over the years! Other people are certain that computer-generated automated valuation models (AVMs), with their access to millions of data points from the overall market, comparable properties, and buyer tendencies, can give estimates that no human can match. So which side is actually better at valuing a home, the owner or the AVM? As it turns out, there isn't really much of a difference between the two options, partially because neither is very good at the job!