Home Mortgage Financing

Save Money by Shopping for the Best Mortgage Rate

When shopping for a particular item, everyone is always on the lookout for the best deal, especially if it's an expensive purchase. This rule holds true for things like shoes, appliances, and cars, but many home buyers fail to shop around when it comes to the most expensive item of all: a mortgage. Freddie Mac recently analyzed just how much money buyers are losing out on over the course of their loan by failing to get multiple quotes, and the number wasn't cheap! In fact, they found that getting just one extra quote saves the average borrower over $1,400!

 

Lower Credit Score After Home Purchase? Don't Worry!

After spending months (or even years) boosting their credit score in order to qualify for the best possible mortgage, new homeowners are often dismayed to see their score fall after finally purchasing their dream home. Perhaps even more alarmingly, this decline often lags several months behind the purchase, making buyers question what actually caused it to happen. Luckily, a new study by LendingTree shows that this is not only normal, but generally corrects itself in less than one year! Keep reading to learn why scores fall after buying a home, how large you should expect the decline to be, and when you can expect the score to return to normal.

Preparation Is Key for First-Time Home Buyers

We know that buying your first home can be very intimidating and even a bit scary. If you hope to buy a home within the next year, there are things you should be doing right now to prepare yourself for the process. In order to make the best decision for your future, it's extremely important that you are equipped with all the knowledge needed to achieve your goals. Tackling each challenge one at a time may get you there faster than you think!

Your Credit Score Might Have Just Gone Up

If you are thinking of buying a home, then one of the most important pieces of information to know is your credit score. A better score will allow you to qualify for a larger loan, as well as grant you access to better interest rates. The result is that a credit score increase could end up saving you thousands of dollars in interest payments over the course of your mortgage, regardless of if it is a new loan or an old one being refinanced! Thankfully, millions of American consumers have seen significant bumps in their score over the course of the last year as the major credit reporting agencies introduced new regulations in how they calculate credit scores. Keep reading to learn why you might want to double-check your score if you haven't done so in a while!

Co-Signing A Loan . . . What Can Go Wrong?

Have you been asked by someone to co-sign on their loan? Before saying yes, even if it is a close relative, you should be aware of the many potential consequences to your own financial situation which could result from the decision. Here are some facts that you should consider:

► As a co-signer, you are essentially taking the loan out yourself. You share in all the responsibilities that go along with the loan. The borrower couldn't get the loan without your "guarantee", so essentially the lender cares more about you than the other borrower. It directly affects your credit and your ability to qualify for your own loans during the period that the loan is outstanding. 

I Want To Buy A House . . . What Credit Score Do I Need To Qualify?

Attaining a perfect credit score of 850 isn't easy; after all, that's like graduating from college with a 4.0! Luckily, all scores of 760 and above are considered to be in the best credit score range. If your credit score is in this category, then CONGRATULATIONS!  You've obviously done some things right to get it there! As a result, lenders really want your business and will therefore offer you their best products at their lowest interest rates. 

Of course, many of us aren't perfect! In that case, a good score is one that falls between 700 and 759, while a fair score is between 650 and 699. A lower score means you’ve had some dings on your credit history. The lower the score, the greater risk you are in the eyes of the lender. You will likely still qualify for a mortgage, but will probably not receive the same rate/cost structure as people with the highest scores.